Psychological, neuropsychological, and electrocortical effects of mixed mold exposure: Psychological Effects of Mold

DonaldDennisM.DResearchers assessed the psychological, neuropsychological, and electrocortical effects of exposure to mixed colonies of toxic molds. Patients who had been exposed to mold were interviewed, filled out a symptoms checklist, and underwent neuropsychological testing and a quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) with neurometric analysis. Situational depression, dysregulation of emotions, and decreased cognitive functioning were among the effects of mold exposure that fit into this psychological, neuropsychological, and electrocortical category.

The amount of mold exposure correlated with QEEG results and neuropsychological test performance, indicating a causal relationship. Those exposed to mold exhibited impairments similar to mild traumatic brain injury. As study authors write, “A dose-response relationship between measures of mold exposure and abnormal neuropsychological test results and QEEG measures suggested that toxic mold causes significant problems in exposed individuals.”

READ ABSTRACT BELOW:
Crago BR, Gray MR, Nelson LA, Davis M, Arnold L, Thrasher JD.
Neurobehavioral Health Services, Tucson, Arizona 85712, USA.
Published in Archives of Environmental Health. 2003 Aug;58(8):452-63.

The authors assessed the psychological, neuropsychological, and electrocortical effects of human exposure to mixed colonies of toxigenic molds. Patients (N = 182) with confirmed mold-exposure history completed clinical interviews, a symptom checklist (SCL-90-R), limited
neuropsychological testing, quantitative electroencephalogram (QEEG) with neurometric analysis, and measures of mold exposure. Patients reported high levels of physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms.

Ratings on the SCL-90-R were “moderate” to “severe,” with a factor reflecting situational depression accounting for most of the variance. Most of the patients were found to suffer from acute stress, adjustment disorder, or post-traumatic stress. Differential diagnosis confirmed an etiology of a combination of external stressors, along with organic metabolically based dysregulation of emotions and decreased cognitive functioning as a result of toxic or metabolic encephalopathy. Measures of toxic mold exposure
predicted QEEG measures and neuropsychological test performance.

QEEG results included narrowed frequency bands and increased power in the alpha and theta bands in the frontal areas of the cortex. These findings indicated a hypoactivation of the frontal cortex, possibly due to brainstem involvement and insufficient excitatory input from the reticular activating system. Neuropsychological testing revealed impairments similar to mild traumatic brain injury. In comparison with premorbid estimates of intelligence, findings of impaired functioning on multiple cognitive tasks predominated. A dose-response relationship between measures of mold exposure and abnormal neuropsychological test results and QEEG measures suggested that toxic mold causes significant problems in
exposed individuals. Study limitations included lack of a comparison group, patient selection bias, and incomplete data sets that did not allow for comparisons among variables.

If you want a copy of this paper contact Dr. Thrasher at toxicologist1@msn.com

Using the environmental treatment protocol can help treat environmental mold.

To read the full article go here Psychological, neuropsychological, and electrocortical effects of mixed mold exposure

Authors: Crago BR, Gray MR, Nelson LA, Davis M, Arnold L, Thrasher JD. Published in Archives of Environmental Health. 2003 Aug;58(8):452-63.